Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples should be aware that the following pages may contain images or names of people who have since passed away.

Cynthia Hardie

Cynthia Hardie

Cynthia was born and raised in Mooroopna and over the years has filled her home with her beautiful creations. Reluctant to part with anything, she says her home is almost full to the rafters. There isn’t anything Cynthia won’t try. Her paintings adorn canvas, rocks, emu eggs, timber, papier-mâché bowls, clap sticks, boomerangs, anything she can get her hands on and often more than one thing at a time. Her love of art and craft began as a child and has continued throughout her life. Mostly self-taught, she enjoys teaching her granddaughters how to paint, sharing her art supplies and painting small canvases and boomerangs. It’s great to share her love of painting with them and see how much they enjoy it also.
In 2007 Cynthia recently added ceramics to her repertoire after attending a class at Shepparton Art Museum (SAM) and followed that up by coming to Kaiela Arts to continue learning.
In 2014 her works featured prominently in the Through the Flame – Ceramics Exhibition recently held at Kaiela Arts as part of the 2014 Indigenous Ceramic Art Award and resulted in commissions. Prior to the exhibition she would never have sold her work and although that’s still an awkward conversation for Cynthia she’s slowly starting to embrace it!
2014 also saw Cynthia’s work being highly commended at the Victorian Indigenous Art Awards.
In 2015 Cynthia took part in a cross collaborative art making project called Collisions. She collaborated with two Indigenous artists and Naomi Ota from Japan. This work was exhibited at SAM and then again at the Benalla Regional Art Gallery in 2016.
2016 saw Cynthia collaborate with fellow artist; Jack Anselmi to create a large ceramic installation called ‘Midden’ which was exhibited as one of five shortlisted collections for the 2016 Indigenous Ceramic Art Award at SAM Shepparton Art Museum. Cynthia and jack won the premier award and the work now sits in the SAM collection.
Cynthia recollects her childhood growing up on The River, playing on the bank and observing the wildlife on the flats. She draws from these memories and fondness for the area when she focuses on her art. She is a proud Yorta Yorta woman and would never consider living anywhere else. It’s important to Cynthia to learn and pass on knowledge because she didn’t learn cultural art from her family. Her Grandparents passed away when she was young; her father was a sportsman so had no time for art. Her mother sewed, so perhaps that’s where Cynthia gets her love of crafts from?